W Machines

* W-30 {1968-1980}
* W-31 {1968-1970}
* W-32 (1969-1970)

* W-33 (1970)
* W-34 (1968-1970)

* W-40 (1983-1984)
* W-41 (1991-1993)

Submit corrections and additions to this information to The Olds FAQ Compiler.



W-30

All W-30s, for all years, were also referred to by the factory as Outside Air Induction (OAI) systems. The W-30 option was in addition to the 442 option. Some with automatic transmissions used column shifters instead of floor mounted shifters.

A basic rundown of engines used is:

1966 - 1967 Short stroke E-block 400
1968 - 1969 Long stroke G-block 400
1970 - 1972 F-block 455
1973 - 1976 Fa-block 455
1976 - 1980 2-block 350

Authentication

This is sort of a prickly subject because the factory was concerned with producing vehicles, not the desires of collectors thirty years later! So you will find some (maybe a lot) of stock, factory, not mickeyed, un-numbers matching vehicles.

It seems to be a matter of record here on the list that Olds was kind of "loose" with the correspondence between the series designation in the VIN and the style number on the body plate, in the period of 1968-1969. As much as we would like to think that Olds inscribed those numbers on the cars purely for the sake of collectors verifying the correctness of these cars thirty years after the fact, the real purpose of them was convenience and record-keeping in the production process. So, if the Lansing plant was able to produce 442's efficiently, with the right parts, by simply installing all the parts in the regular Cutlass bodyshell (which would differ from the 442 shell by only two digits in that data plate), then there's no reason for them not to. Of course, the VIN would have to reflect the models that the dealers actually ordered, and since different prices were given for the different models, a dealer who was expecting a VIN beginning with 344 would feel cheated if he got a list of an incoming car beginning with VIN 336.

In theory, the VIN and Body (cowl) Tag should match, but it is really the VIN that counts. For example, Lansing 442's (at least) came off the line with regular Cutlass body plates, even though the VIN is correct for a 442. However, someone could have changed the VIN - check for new rivets! One other way to think about this: if someone did alter the car to look like a 442, why would they add the VIN, but not the body plate, from a 442? A body plate is a lot simpler to replace; would someone with an original 442 try to pass it off as a regular Cutlass by installing a "336..." body plate?

1967 through 1971 W-30's have red inner fender wells. 1968 and 1969 have a four inch diameter hole cut in the horizontal surface of the inner fender directly behind the head lights on each side for the ducting to the under-the-bumper scoops. Typically this hole will have a rough edge which makes it look like a custom job. 1967 pulled it's air from around the lights, so there is no hole in the inner fender.

The aluminum intakes (W-30 or W-31) were not produced until the 1970 model year.

1970 through 1972 used the W25 OAI hood rather than the under-the-bumper scoops so there would be no holes in the fender well.

Starting in 1972, the inner fender wells are black, although the first 10 1972 W-30's came with red fender wells (Actual fact by Helen Early, Olds Historic curator). These 10 cars would have had to be produced in late 1971.

All W-machines for the 1966 to at least 1972 model year were made in Lansing ("M" is the 7th character in the VIN). W-30s have less body and sound insulation.

Unfortunately, 1968 to 1971 442's can be made up to W-30's if they have all the right parts. The real way is with a build sheet. For 1972 only, the VIN's engine digit will contain an X. In short, just make sure it is a 442 with the VIN stating 344 and look for options.

To identify if the car is a REAL W-30

Motorbooks International's Oldsmobile 4-4-2 & W-Machine Restoration Guide is a good beginning reference.

[ Notice: ]Please refer to the Engines section for authentication as well!
[ Notice: ]Please refer to the Blocks section for authentication as well!
[ Notice: ]Please refer to the Heads section for authentication as well!
[ Notice: ]Please refer to the Intake Manifolds section for authentication as well!
[ Notice: ]Please refer to the Exhaust Manifolds section for authentication as well!
[ Notice: ]Please refer to the Carburetors section for authentication as well!


1966:

Authentication:


Only 54 factory made, to meet NHRA drag racing mandates. The NHRA rule mandated that these be assembly line/factory built units. All were hardtops, no convertibles. They were apparently considered something special by the factory right from the start because the air cleaner/shroud of each car was stamped with a unique number, 1 through 54. They were sold only to selected dealers, and virtually all were used in drag racing.

A very small number (93) of dealer installed W-30 packages were also installed. There was only 147 Tri-Carb breather assemblies made. These over the parts counter W-30s are called "Track Pac Cars". These were not numbered. About 13 are known to remain. The only difference between a factory W-30 and the "Trak-Pak" versions would be that the factory supplied engines were pretty much blueprinted right in Lansing.

The "Trak Pak" dealer installed W-30 packages included a cam, springs, bumper installed air intakes, big chrome air cleaner (shroud in GM speak), cables and related items to mount the battery on the rear kick up in the trunk. The owner would have to also purchase the L-69 items in order to install this package, unless already on the car.

The L-69 option was the tri-power setup and not necessarily a race package any more than the equivalent GTOs of the period. The ram air packages were much more drag strip oriented. Olds called their system outside air induction or OAI. The order option code was W-30.

Although overshadowed by the high compression 455 CID motors of the 1970 model year, these are arguably the fastest W-30 Olds' produced due to the light weight of the 1966 models and the highly tuned, select built 400 CID motor. Intake scoops were placed near the middle on each side of the front bumper by moving the park/turn signals inboard about a foot. 4 inch ducting hoses routed cool ambient air to a special air cleaner assembly. The air cleaner was a two piece affair which covered the three carbs, the top part was chromed, the base black painted steel. These two parts sandwiched the air filters for each carb in place. If you've never seen one run, stick around if you ever see one at the drags. It WILL impress you. High 12 secondsto low 13's were normal. Also look at the MPH that these cars are making thru the traps.

Factory Production
Standard Club Coupe 25
Deluxe Holiday Hardtop 8
Cutlass Sports Coupe 5
Cutlass Holiday Coupe 16
Cutlass Convertible 0
Total 54

Engine Specs:

Transmissions:

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:

[ Thanks to Bob Handren, Jeff Mullenix, Jim Chermack others for this information ]


1967:

Authentication:

The fellow with absolutely the most knowledge of 1966 to 1967 W-30's is Curt Anderson. He is the advisor on these cars for the Olds Club of America. He can be reached at 612-398-3079, P.O. Box 506, Kimball, MI 55353-0506. You will not be disappointed in spending the phone call to Curt.


502 were factory assembled for 1967, to meet NHRA drag racing mandates. The NHRA rule mandated that these be assembly line/factory built units. maybe a hundred or so dealer installed cars. Since the battery was in the trunk, this package could not be installed in convertibles. This was the first year where red fender liners were used to mark the W-30 package. Only factory installed W-30s received these distinctive pieces. An unknown number of dealer installed W-30 packages were also available. In any case, this is the second most rare W-30 of the muscle car wars. Probably less than 100 remain.

An air cleaner/shroud similar to the 1966 version was used. The differences were that since all GM models except the Corvette were restricted to single carburation, only a single Quadra-Jet 4 barrel carb was used. A large chrome air cleaner was still used as well as the 4 inch ducting hose. It was routed a little differently. The air inlets were now placed between the headlights. Each side had an upper and lower inlet which supplied air through the radiator support. These connected to a "Y" shaped duct behind the lights in the radiator support which connected to the 4 inch hose.

A "Trak-Pak" similar to that of 1966 was available. The "Trak-Pak" did not include the red fender liners. Since these are not being reproduced, they are a very good indicator of an original 1967 W-30.

There were no 1967 W-30 convertibles made - buyer beware!

The 1967 W-30's were very successful drag racing packages with nearly the same eventual performance as the 1966 versions.

The first year for a W-30 could be equipped with an automatic transmission. From the Olds "Technical Tips Review" literature:

"Oldsmobile has available two different transmissions - a manual and an
automatic...

...The automatic transmission, shown here, is the Turbo Hydra-Matic. It
is identified by the letters W-O-G found on the transmission serial number
plate. The internal parts of this transmission are the same as those in any
Turbo Hydra-Matic. However, the calibration, made at the factory, are different. For example, the W-O-G transmission has higher wide-open
throttle shift points than other Turbo Hydra-Matics...

...The W-O-G transmission will exhibit much firmer upshifts and downshifts at
all speeds and throttle openings. The firmer shifts are necessary to
achieve the top perfomance the W-30 is noted for..."

The only power option available was power steering. I have not seen a 67 W-30 with power brakes.

Factory Production
Cutlass Supreme Sports Coupe 129
Cutlass Supreme Holiday Coupe 373
Cutlass Supreme Convertible 0
Total 502

Engine Specs:
Four different distributors were used, two point-type and two UHV. Interestingly, most 67 W-30s had distributors with mechanical advance only, while early cars got the vacuum advance as well (hence the four different distributors).

Transmissions:
W-O-G TH-400 was used. It was a switch pitch TH-400 that had a shift kit installed at the factory.

Rear Axles:
A Type-P anti-spin differential with four different pinion gears and a choice of 3.55, 3.90, or 4.33:1 ratios.

Factory 67 W-30's used a special 10 bolt "P" (Pontiac) axle. These units featured four pinion gears in the carrier (normal differentials use two pinions).

Performance Data:

[ Thanks to Bob Handren, Jim Chermack, Joe Padavano, for this information ]


1968:

Authentication:

Engine Specs:

68: The 68 W-30's had autos and also could be had with the 328 duration cam. This would give you the 2300 RPM converter in the trans. No pwr brakes with those. If you ordered your W-30 auto with P/B then you got a milder cam like the 70 W-30 auto cars.

Transmissions:

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:

[ Thanks to Joe Padavano, Jim Chermack for this information ]


1969:

Authentication:

The 69 W-30's had autos and also could be had with the 328 duration cam. This would give you the 2300 RPM converter in the trans. No pwr brakes with those. If you ordered your W-30 auto with P/B then you got a milder cam like the 70 W-30 auto cars.

Engine Specs:

Transmissions:

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:

[ Thanks to Jim Chermack for this information ]


1970:

Authentication:


The W-25 OAI fiberglass hood was standard. A/C and power brakes were first available on the W-30 in 1970.

I still have a set of original '70 W-30 fenders and they do have the grease penciled "W-30 " on the backsides. I noticed this when I removed the fenders in '84 and always assumed this was the method used to insure the W-30 fenders would get the extra set of holes for the W-30 emblems. W-31's would fall into the same category. This made sense because there are no other differences between these and the std. fenders other than the emblem holes. I do find it interesting that someone else took note of this and am sure that if other owners still have some untouched original fenders that they will find the same thing.

Engine Specs:
The W-30 carbs had no primary metering rods. This has been confirmed for AT cars. The carb (p/n 7040256) has 058 jets on the primary side and the bore for the power valve is capped. Also, in the throttle plate assembly, there is normally a threaded hole for the adjusting screw for the power valve stop (this adjustment was done in the factory and a cap was pressed into the hole). This hole is not drilled on the 7040256 throttle plate.

Transmissions:

Rear Axles:
Code Ratio Notes
SF 3.23:1 Only with auto and A/C
TM 3.42:1 std
TO 3.91:1 opt

Performance Data:
13.88 covering the ¼ mile. 0-60MPH in 5.7 seconds; ¼ mile in 13.63 seconds.
"Hot Rod": ¼ mile in 13.98 seconds at 100.78 MPH.
"Road Test":¼ mile in 14.2 seconds at 102.14 MPH.

[ Thanks to Brad Otto, Joe Padavano, Scott Jerdan, Mike Blankenship, Carl Dudash, Kevin Hoopingarner for this information ]


1971:

Authentication:

One other little spotter tip for the 71-72 W-30s is the fuel filter. These cars used a unique external filter on the output side of the pump. The filter is a metal canister, about 2" in diameter and about 3" long. Unlike all prior W-30s and 442s, which had two output lines from the fuel pump - one to the carb and one a fuel return to the tank - the 71-72 W-cars had only a single fuel pump output line which went into this filter. The filter then had two output lines from it, one to the carb and one the fuel return. The filter itself was mounted just above the fuel pump. Now, there's a good chance that the replacement engine does not have the original pump and filter, but if it does, and the metal fuel lines look original (instead of being brand new repros), this would likely support the fact that the car is a true W-30.


The W-25 OAI fiberglass hood was standard.

There were 920 W-30s made in 1971, of which 110 were ragtops.

Engine Specs:

Transmissions:

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:

¼ mile in 14.4 seconds. 0 - 60 in 6.1 seconds.
[ Thanks to Kurt, Joe Padavano for this information ]


1972:

Authentication:

All have "Cutlass" on the glovebox, except for those who changed it - "'Course, the first thing I did when I got my 72 years ago was to run down to the dealer and get a 70-71 "442" glovebox emblem. The holes line right up."

One other little spotter tip for the 71-72 W-30s is the fuel filter. These cars used a unique external filter on the output side of the pump. The filter is a metal canister, about 2" in diameter and about 3" long. Unlike all prior W-30s and 442s, which had two output lines from the fuel pump - one to the carb and one a fuel return to the tank - the 71-72 W-cars had only a single fuel pump output line which went into this filter. The filter then had two output lines from it, one to the carb and one the fuel return. The filter itself was mounted just above the fuel pump. Now, there's a good chance that the replacement engine does not have the original pump and filter, but if it does, and the metal fuel lines look original (instead of being brand new repros), this would likely support the fact that the car is a true W-30.


The W-25 OAI fiberglass hood was standard.

Engine Specs:

Transmissions:

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:

¼ mile in 14.5 seconds. 0 - 60 in 6.6 seconds.
[ Thanks to Matt Cremean, James Stafford, Joe Padavano for this information ]


1979:

Authentication:


The W-30 for 1979 was a Cutlass with the Hurst/Olds option.

Engine Specs:

Transmissions:

Rear Axles:

[ Thanks to Chad Schwartz for this information ]


1980:

Authentication:


Only 886 made, 538 black, 348 white. W-30 simply gave the car W-30 decals, nothing more. The paint scheme is the same as the 1979 H/O. Externally, the only differences that I can see between a 1979 H/O and the 1980 442 W-30 is that the 1980 has 4 headlights. A rear deck spoiler is a dealer installed opttion, not factory. There are 442 badges on the fenders, rear trunk and interior door panels.

Engine Specs:
350 with 3A heads.

Transmissions:

A TH-350 with the code "LJ". No other cars used that trans code.

Rear Axles:

[ Thanks to Jason Labay for this information ]


W-31

A Cutlass w/350 CID performance option, not a 442 option.

Technically, the W-31 was only built in 1969 and 1970. While not called a W-31, the equivalent vehicle was available and called the "Ram Rod 350" in 1968. All W-31's came with manual brakes only, due to the 308° duration cams (e.g. not enough vacuum to operater power brakes). But it's not hard to add a booster, though. You just need a reliable vacuum source.

Authentication:

Special dual snorkle air cleaner with chrome lid. Inner fenders have special holes in them for air induction system, along with brackets on the inner fenders for the hoses and scoops. Inner fender wells are black, not red; red is incorrect for a W-31.

One of the ways that you can help 'identify' a W-31 is that they used a lot less sound deadening material to save some weight. Close the trunk lid. If it sounds nice and solid and tight, that isn't a good sign. But it MAY have been replaced, so this is not a guarantee. If it sounds hollow, like you're clanging an empty steel trash can, then this will signify a W-trunk lid. Also, the firewall pad, if it is original, is very thin compared to non-Ws.

Exclusive to the W-31 was a special bend in the fuel line near the fuel pump. It's WHERE the bend occurs that determines the W-31. The W-31's have the bend clamped to the frame after the plate that is welded between the channels of the frame, whereas non-W-31's have the bend clamped to the frame on that plate.

W-31 balancers are HUGE compared to regular 350 and 455 balancers. Resembles a steel version of a "F-60 x 15" tire. In other words, that sucker is HUGE! Very thick. Don't ask me why - they just are.

The car should have front AND rear sway bars with boxed lower rear control arms like the 4-4-2.

If the car is an auto, the code on the tranny is JO.

W-31's used standard 350 exhaust manifolds with the block off plate.

Sport mirrors.

Built only in Lansing (should have that plant code in VIN).

[ Notice: ]Please refer to the Engines section for authentication as well!
[ Notice: ]Please refer to the Blocks section for authentication as well!
[ Notice: ]Please refer to the Heads section for authentication as well!
[ Notice: ]Please refer to the Intake Manifolds section for authentication as well!

[ Thanks to Tony Waldner, Chris Smetana, Jim Chermack, Joe Padavano,for this information ]


1968:

Authentication:

  • Special carb number 7028255.


F-85 W-31 "Ram Rod". I believe Olds only produced 501 of them.

Engine Specs:
It had a 325 HP 350 CI engine with Ram Air (under the bumper scoops feeding the 350 ci engine).

Details:
10.5 comp. ratio (flat top pistons).
#5 heads fitted with 2" intake valves and 1.625" exhausts.
Camshaft was 308 degree duration and .474" lift.
Matching heavy duty valve springs.
Special recalibrated Q-Jet carb.
Larger harmonic balancer.
Standard cast iron intake.
Engines were "select-fit" assembled. Cylinder bores are honed to the "D" spec. and use "A" pistons resulting in a larger skirt clearance of .003" - .0035".
A 6 blade fan with a fan clutch was used.
All were Force-Air inducted.
No special W-31 coded distributor. Used that years standard 350 4bbl distributor.
Exhaust manifolds were the same as the standard 350. But BOTH exhaust pipes and mufflers were 2 1/4" inlets (2" outlet).

Transmissions:

Hurst 4-speed.

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:


1969:

Authentication:

  • Special carb number 7029255.
  • Distributor number 1111975.


Under the bumper scoops feed the 350 CID engine.

A total of 26 Cutlass convertibles with the W-31 package were built in 1969. It also happened to be the ONLY year that a W-31 could be had as a Rag Top. A very, very, rare W-Machine!

Engine Specs:

Details:
Engines were "select-fit" assembled. Cylinder bores are honed to the "D" spec. and use "A" pistons resulting in a larger skirt clearance of .003" - .0035".
10.5 comp. ratio (flat top pistons).
#5 heads fitted with 2" intake valves and 1.625" exhausts.
Camshaft was 308 degree duration and .474" lift.
Matching heavy duty valve springs.
Special recalibrated Q-Jet carb.
Larger harmonic balancer.
Standard cast iron intake.
A 6 blade fan with a fan clutch was used.
All were Force-Air inducted.
No special W-31 coded distributor. Used that year's standard 350 4bbl distributor.
Exhaust manifolds were the same as the standard 350. But BOTH exhaust pipes and mufflers were 2 1/4" inlets (2" outlet).

Transmissions:

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:
"Car Life": 0-60 in 6.6 seconds; ¼ mile in 14.9 seconds at 96 MPH.

[ Thanks to Chris Smetana, Michael Hall, Greg Rollin for this information ]


1970:

Authentication:

  • The ram air (OAI) hood is only correct for 1970 W-31's.
  • Special carb number 7040255.


The W-25 OAI fiberglass hood was standard.

Helen Early has confirmed about a dozen W-31 Rallye 350's were made. So they are out there.

1,352 were sold.
207 F-85 club coupe
116 Cutlass club coupe
1029 Cutlass hardtop coupe

Engine Specs:

Details:
Engines were "select-fit" assembled. Cylinder bores are honed to the "D" spec. and use "A" pistons resulting in a larger skirt clearance of .003" - .0035".
10.5 comp. ratio (flat top pistons).
#6 heads fitted with 2" intake valves and 1.625" exhausts.
Camshaft was 308 degree duration and .474" lift.
Matching heavy duty valve springs.
Special recalibrated Q-Jet carb.
Larger harmonic balancer.
Aluminum intake.
A 6 blade fan with a fan clutch was used.
All were Force-Air inducted.
No special W-31 coded distributor. Used that year's standard 350 4bbl distributor, 1111975.
Exhaust manifolds were the same as the standard 350. But BOTH exhaust pipes and mufflers were 2 1/4" inlets (2" outlet).

Transmissions:
If it is an automatic, a "JO" coded TH-350 tranny was used.

Details:
I have been researching the available of an auto in the 69 W-31 and been looking at pretty much the same documentation as others. Some sources say it isn't available, some say it is. But from what I can tell it definitely was available in 1969. The code on my '69 W-31's tranny is JO and it has a 69 build date. A couple places I checked for this tranny code don't list JO in 69, but in 70 it is the correct code for an auto W-31. The only thing I haven't verified is if the numbers match the vin.

And now from an

Oldsmobile Bulletin                    Marketing Department
New Car Merchandising
Subject 1969 Option W30 and W31 Force-Air Induction Systems
Number N/C 68-17
Date October 10, 1968
This document explains the W options and on page 2 lists option M38, Turbo 350 has been added to the choice of W31 transmissions. "The three-speed automatic transmission is specifically calibrated to match the high output of the W31 engine."

It also has an availablilty option chart and a sample order form. And the final interesting piece and I quote "First factory shipment of units ordered with W30 and W31 will be during the latter part of the week beginning October 28."

So there you have it, not only the letter but a date as well. It would be interesting to see build dates for ALL 69 W-Machines as this would (seem to) clearly indicate that all W30 and W31 better have a build date in Sept? at the earliest. This also explains why the shop manual, printed in Sept, does not reference an auto W-31.

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:

[ Thanks to Bryan Bodine, Nick DiGiovanni, Chris Smetana, Greg Rollin, Jim Chermack for this information ]


W-32

"For the person who wants something in-between the W-31 and W-30".


1969:

Authentication:

  • Special carb number 7029251.

A 442 option upon which 297 were built (25 Sport Coupes, 247 Holiday Coupes, and 25 Convertibles.). 350 hp compared to 360 for the W-30. a toned down, "more streetable" version of the W-30 with a milder cam (286 degree and .472 lift) that could run power brakes and a standard TH-400 transmission. The W-32 option provided W-30 equipment (the same OAI but the engine was basically the 4 speed combination) with a milder cam and mandatory auto transmission, as well as W-32 badges, a decal above the front quarter marker lights.

These cars were produced in any plant (not just Lansing like the W-30 and W-31), and the engine was not hand assembled with selected parts like the W-30 and W-31's. The cam specs were slightly different than the stick engine. The W-30 cam provided inadequate vacuum for A/C, and so A/C was unavailable with W-30 that year, so it stands to reason that W-32, with its smoother cam, could have been sold to people who wanted a performance boost and air conditioning.

It appears that in 1969, Oldsmobile was fiddling with the horsepower numbers - one of their publications lists the W-32 engine at 360 HP, while all of the other charts I found list it at 350 HP. Also, the dealer literature says that A/C is not available, but the W-Machines brochure doesn't list A/C as an option not available. My guess is the brochure, being simply a single piece of blue paper folded twice, was a first stab at getting the word to the streets and is probably not as trustworthy as other sources.

The W-32 option was available on the
442 Sport Coupe
442 Holiday Coupe
442 Convertible

And Includes:
400 CID 360 HP engine with
special camshaft
special distributor
heavy-duty water pump
aluminum fan and special fan clutch
W-32 front fender decals










Mandatory Options:
Anti-spin rear axle G-80
Heavy-duty radiator V-01, V-02
Fiberglas belted tires P-81
Special Turbo Hydramatic transmission M-YO
Hood paint stripe Y-73

Options Not Available:
Power door locks A-93
Engine cooling equipment Y-72










Engine Specs:

Transmissions:

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:


1970:

Authentication:

A very small number of W-32 machines were built. The supposed number of these W-32 cars built were 1,025 units. There has been no firm documentation of exact numbers. These cars were produced in any plant (not just Lansing like the W-30 and W-31), and the engine was not hand assembled with selected parts like the W-30 and W-31's.

The 442 no longer received the option, however. That honor went to the Cutlass Supreme, which also carried the SX package. So a 1970 W-32 was a Cutlass Supreme, with the SX and W-32 options. You could have an SX without the W-32 option, but not a W-32 without the SX option. The only year both the SX and the W-32 were available was 1970. To be precise, the W-32 was an engine option on the Y-79 "SX" high-performance Cutlass Supreme option: you could get an SX that was not a W-32.

In its second year (1970), however, the W-32 lost its decal and thus became in the words of Holder & Krunz, an unofficial W-32. This unofficial status is highlighted by the fact that accurate records were not kept on production figures.

There were three 455's that could be found in a '70 SX.

The standard engine early on was the high-compression 2-bbl L-33 455; it was also available on the regular Cutlass and wagon lines. Small-valve heads and a mild camshaft was used in the engines for those cars. This engine was out of production by February. The L-33 was replaced by the L-31 365hp 4-bbl 455 as the standard SX engine, standard with the Y-79 package, and the W-32 365hp 4-bbl 455 remained as an optional engine upgrade. This L-31 was same 455 engine that was installed in the big-cars that year: small valves, mild cam, but still with the same 365hp rating that the W-32 carried.

So, The W-32 365hp 4-bbl 455 was available from the beginning, as an upgrade to the standard L-33 320hp 2-bbl high-compression 455. It's listed as an option in the factory shop manual, which has a printing date of October 1969. After February of 1970, the L-33 was dropped, and the L-31 365hp 4-bbl 455 became the standard engine with the Y-79 package, and the W-32 365hp 4-bbl 455 remained as an optional engine upgrade. Though the hp ratings are the same, the W-32 was the same as the 442 engine of that year, and therefore had bigger intake valves and a more performance-oriented camshaft than the L-31, which was basically the same engine they installed as standard in the full-size cars.

FWIW, the Y-79 option was the performance package for the Cutlass Supreme lineup, and the W-32 was an engine option on that performance package, even though that performance package was basically only an engine option. The only thing included in the Y-79 performance option was the specific drivetrain package, not any handling/visual enhancements like the 442, except perhaps the 12-bolt rear and the cutout rear bumper with trumpet exhausts. Oh, yeah, the "SX" badges as well, but those are about as subtle as can be. I had thought the Y-79 package also included the buckets and console w/floor shifter interior, but that's not the case.

BTW, the L-33 was an engine exclusive to the Cutlass/Cutlass Supreme lineup for its brief life in the first half of the 1970 model year. The 2-bbl engine installed in the full-size cars had lower compression, and lower hp.

The W-32 455 engine was rated at 365hp, but used the 442's larger cam and intake valves, different carb jetting, etc. The W-32 used the same exact motor that the assembly-line workers were installing on the 442's produced at the same plant: big valves, lopier cam, richer carb, 365hp rating, etc. This W-32 option also included the 442's TH400 transmission, with its firmer shifts.

Under the bumper scoops feed the 455 CID engine, but the W-25 OAI fiberglass hood was optional. It could be the ram-air hood was a dealer-installed item only.

Reportedly, there were 7,197 SX-optioned Cutlass S models built that year. The amount of W-32 optioned cars built is around 1,025. There has been no firm documentation of exact numbers. Apparently, there were no W-32 emblems or such to identify the W-32 365hp motor (which was identical to the stock 442 powerplant, but only called W-32 when installed in the Cutlass Supreme notchback body style).

The standard transmission was the TH-400 Turbo Hydra-matic. The L-33 or L-31 cars (SX) both used the OD code TH-400. The W-32 uses the OG code TH-400 found in the base 442.

The W-32 cars had more performance options than a regular SX. 3.08:1 and the 3.23:1 differentials were found in many of the W-32's. The L-31 and L-33 cars (SX) had the 2.56:1 as the most common. Also this year, the W-32 included dual exhaust.

When you get right down to it, all the W-32 consisted of in its second and final year was an engine option. Olds might have been going after the same as Pontiac with their Grand Prix SJ as well as the Monte Carlo SS, the high-performance Mercurys, and the various Mopar cars that could be optioned to the hilt with luxury items (like the RT/SE Chargers and such). Without the "W" tag, it might not have been as apparent to insurance companies that this was actually a 442 in disguise.

Engine Specs:
SX: 365 hp L-31 (2bbl) or L-33 (4bbl) 455 engine.
W-32: All of them had the base 365 hp 442 455 engine.

Transmissions:
SX: OD code TH400.
W-32: All of them had the OG code TH400.

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:
"Motor Trend": 0-60 in 6.6 seconds. ¼ mile in 14.8 seconds at 95 MPH.

[ Thanks to Bob Barry, Curt Salada, Jim Chermack for this information ]


W-33

Delta 88 performance option. 1970 only.


1970:

A motor option only, optional on all 88's. This was the 390hp 455 option (with dual exhaust), which was also the police package pursuit motor. Speedometer read "Police certified" on the bottom.

Suspension and trim upgrades were separate options. Upgraded suspension consisted of heavy duty springs, boxed control arms, posi rear, rear sway bar, and special "OL" code TH-400 transmission.

Engine Specs:

Transmissions:

TH-400 with code "OL".

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:

No data.


W-34

Toronado performance option.


1968:

About 111 were built.

Engine Specs:

High-lift-cam (#400165) 400hp 455 with OAI. Might use distributor 1111982.

Transmissions:

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:

No data.


1969:

The W-34 could be identified by cutouts in the rear bumper for the dual exhaust. Other than a different front grille design and different rear fenders (squared off, not sloping down to the bumper), the 1969 is nearly identical to the 1968. No OAI.

Engine Specs:

High-lift-cam (#400165) 400 hp 455. Might use distributor 1111982.

Transmissions:

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:

No data.


1970:

Same motor as 1969, except that there was a "GT" option with the 400hp motor, apparently available in any paint scheme. The fender arches also changed into flares, and Olds did away with hideaway headlights in the new grill design. No OAI.

Many myths exist concerning the 1970 Toro GT. Perhaps it is because few articles have been written about this fine car. It remains shrouded in the mists. It is my intent with this article to shed light on the truths of this car which has been called "the quickest and fastest luxury car on the road in 1970"(1). I would like to express my thanks to Mrs. Helen Early for the assistance she provided me in the preparation of this article.

The 1970 Toro GT has its roots in 1968 when the 425 cubic inch motor was replaced in the Toronado with a 455. The final drive was also changed from 3.21 to 3.07. A very special high performance option was offered for the first time in 1968 and was called the W-34 option.

At the heart of the 1968 and all other W-34s in 1969 and 1970 was the GM part #400165 engine camshaft. This camshaft was also seen in the 1968 and 1969 Hurst Olds and the W-30 442 with automatic transmission. The W-34 Toronados did not have the special D or F heads seen in the W-30 442s but rather had stock Toronado heads C (1968 and 1969) or E (1970). Essentially it was this camshaft that made these cars so unique. Production number in 1968 for the W-34 was 111.

This option also included a forced air induction package. This was a one year only offering as the 1969 and 1970 W-34s did not have this assembly. "Car Life" in May of 1968 ran a test drive of the 1968 W-34 and reported a final drive ratio of 3.36. It appears this may be in error as "Car and Driver" in April 1968 also road tested a 1968 W-34 and reported a final drive of 3.07. As performance tests were similar, it leads me to conclude the "Car Life" article to be incorrect or perhaps it was a special factory offering. All my other sources do not confirm a final drive of 3.36 ever being available in any Toronado.

The 1968 W-34 was dual exhausted through a notched bumper with chrome tips. The non W-34 1968 Toronados had a single tail pipe from the large transverse muffler. The 1968 Toros were the first Toros to have single exhaust tail pipes.

In 1969, the W-34 continued but lost its cold air induction assembly and notched rear bumper with chrome tips although dual tail pipes persisted. Non W-34 1969 Toros were single tail piped. At present, the production number of 1969 W-34 is unknown. Final drive remained at 3.07.

In 1970, Oldsmobile blew the doors down with a large number of very potent performance cars and they went all out for the W-34 option. It was for the first time called a GT. Thus the Toro GT was born and died as a one year only option. The pulsing and beating 400165 camshaft persisted for one last time and was coupled with a redesigned torque converter. According to Motor Trend, October 1969, the new torque converter "improved the force of acceleration by 1500 lbs. at 5MPH, shortly after start". "It held the engine speed at or near the torque speed for a greater time."

Final drive was 3.07. The notched rear bumper returned with chrome exhaust tips. A special GT emblem was found on the front hood next to the Toronado name and special paint striping was applied around the wheel openings. Production was 5341 out of total production of 25,433.

All the W-34s were rated at 400 hp which is the highest horsepower rating Oldsmobile has put in any of its production cars to date. The 1970 GT was just another option such as cruise control but when ordered for $47.30, it created a very special car. Some people are surprised there were so many 1970 GTs but I'm surprised there were so few. My personal view is that they all should have been GTs. The 70 GTs are more fitting with the Toronado as a luxury performance automobile which is the way it was started in 1966. The 1970 GT was the last performance Toronado. Just as the 442 was a special performance modification to the Oldsmobile "A" body, I think of the 1970 Toro GT as a special performance modification to the Oldsmobile "E" body. The analogy only fits so far as the myths will tell.

Myth #1 The 1970 Toro GT has a different final drive. False. It has the standard 3.07.
Myth #2 The Toro GT has a heavier suspension. Also false. The GTs had stock Toro suspension. However, a heavy duty suspension could be ordered (F41) on any 1970 Toro for only $21.06. Incidentally, this F41 option contained the same front torsion bar as the 1966 Toronado. The rear springs were different.
Myth #3 The 1970 Toro GT contained a heavy duty radiator. Again false, but Y72 option was available for any 1970 Toro and bought you a four core radiator. Why not also order M55 automatic transmission auxiliary oil cooler for only $15.80?
Myth #4 The Toro GT was only available on the deluxes. The GT option was available on either the standard or deluxe Toros. The only difference in standard or deluxe is the interior (door panels and seat upholstery). 23,082 1970 Toronados were deluxe and 2,351 were standard. It is not known how many of each were GTs but if one used the ratio of 1:5 an estimation of 4,616 deluxe GTs and 470 standard GTs could be made. The accuracy of this is highly speculative.

As the 1970 Toro GTs with bucket seats may be the most desirable to collect, it is interesting to note that the 1970 custom Toronados (9687) with bucket seats came in only two colors, black and saddle. The 1970 standard Toronados (9487) with bucket seats came in only one color, ivory. So a 1970 Toro GT (or non GT) could have one of three interior colors if it had bucket seats. Black, saddle or ivory depending if standard or deluxe Toronado. It should be added that bucket seats in the 1970 Toronado could be ordered with no additional cost. However, the sport console (D55) option cost an additional $50.55. It included floor transmission shift. The D55 option was not necessarily coupled with the bucket seats. I have seen Toronados with bucket seats without the sport console and floor shift.

How do you know if it's really a 1970 GT or a W-34 in 1968 or 1969? The bumpers are easily changed. Paint is frequently sprayed over the GT stripes or added to non GT cars. The hood emblem is also easily added or perhaps the whole hood is replaced with the GT emblems. The way I tell is to first look at the transmission code. It is on the left side of the transmission and riveted to the case. It should have the letters OM instead of a regular Toronado transmission letters OJ. If you find an OM, wipe off the grease and look for the VIN stamped on the transmission case near the code letters. If this VIN matches the car VIN you are half way finished.

Next remove the power steering pump bracket that attaches to the left side of the engine block. Under the bracket is another VIN on the engine block which must match the transmission and frame VIN. If all match, congratulations, it is a W-34 regardless of the rest of the appearance. Remember, it is the combination of motor and transmission that makes these cars unique. Another way to check the motor would be to pull the cam and check the identification on the end. Of course, the window sticker or a factory build sheet would also clarify the- situation but I have not been that lucky yet.

How much are they worth? It's worth what someone will pay you for it. Prices seem to be comparable to the 1966 Toro but it must be remembered the much greater rarity of the W-34. There are quite a few 1970 GTs around and my advice is to take the time to find what you really want and at the right price. Be prepared to pay significantly for a real nice one. In my experience I find many are, overrated in condition. Unless it has undergone recent restoration expect to have major front end and brake repair. Rust under the rocker panels are a very common finding in any first generation Toronado and Comfortron can add many problems if not working properly.

My own collection of Toronados includes six 1970 GTs in various stages of restoration. They range from parts car status to blue ribbon winner. All were obtained in the local area and I would encourage all my fellow enthusiasts to look locally as you will be able to get a better car at a better price. Look at all 1970 Toros offered for sale as many people do not realize the GT is special.

The 1970 Toro GT is the ultimate expression of performance in the Oldsmobile Toronado. It is to me more enjoyable to drive and more responsive than a 442. The braking is superb and the handling great. I can recommend this car to all who love Oldsmobiles.

Engine Specs:

High-lift-cam (#400165) 400 hp 455. F block with E heads.

Transmissions:

TH-425 coded "OM". Special torque convertor for 1970 - holds engine RPM closer to peak torque longer.

Axles:

Final drive was 3.07.

Performance Data:

No data.


W-40

This option code was used to signify the '83 and '84 H/O package.

[ Notice: ]Please refer to the 1983 Hurst/Olds section as well!
[ Notice: ]Please refer to the 1984 Hurst/Olds section as well!

The W-40 Hurst/Olds option was based on the Cutlass Calais K47 Style. 3500 were built in 1984, and 2500 were built in the first run of 1983, followed by a second run of 501 for a total of 3001 '83 models.

According to the 1984 Olds Specs book: W-40 Hurst/Olds Package $1995.00
Includes Silver Metallic and Black special paint scheme with Red and Black accent stripes on Upper Sides and Front-End Panel. Blacked-out Bumpers, Bumper Guards, Headlamp Doors, Tail Lamp and Backup Lamp Bezels with Black and Bright Grille, Amber Park/Turn Lamp lenses, Chrome and Silver Super Stock Wheels with Red accent stripe (N83), Black Front Lower Air Dam, Silver Deck Lid Spoiler, Non-functional Hood Scoop and Bumper Rub Strip Moldings.

Includes all Calais interior features such as Reclining Bucket Front Seats (AR9), Outside Mirrors (D35) Silver, Sport Console (D55), Firm Ride and Handling Package (F41) plus superlift Air Shock Absorbers, Custom Sport Steering Wheel (NK3), P215/65R15 Goodyear Eagle GT Tires (QYH), Instrument Panel Rallye Cluster (U21) and Tungsten Halogen Headlamps (TT5), 5.0-liter V-8 engine (LV2) with high-performance camshaft and dual-outlet exhaust system: 4-speed Automatic Overdrive Transmission (MX0) with special Hurst "lightning Rod" shifter and a 3.73 Axle Ratio (GT4).

Probably the most important option codes (these will be on the inside trunk sticker - if the sticker is there) are the W40 code, and it will be on the cowl tag, also. Also on the trunk sticker will be N83- code for H/O option wheels, D55 - console for H/Os. F41 for Firm ride/ handling suspension. NK3 for sport steering wheel. QYH for the P215/65R15 tires. LV2 for the 5.0 Liter V9 engine (the number 9 will be the 8th digit on the VIN). MX0 for the 4-speed overdrive trans with Hurst "Lightning Rods" shifter.

Available on K47 with exterior color 17 Silver Metallic and Interior Trims 23 Royal Blue Cloth, 25 Maple Red Cloth or 55 Maple Red Vinyl - D68 available C60 and V08 required - N.A. with B84, B93, C04, N66, N91, QHW, QJR, QMW, QMX, U35, U46 or Y71. According to this the interior also came in a Royal Blue Cloth. I've only seen the red vinyl and red cloth. Can anyone else verify ever having seen a blue-interiored '84 H/O?

The only options not included or limited by the W40 package were:

CC1 Removable Roof Panels $825.00
G80 Differential, Limited Slip $95.00
K07 Heater, Engine Block $18.00

Plus a choice of 5 different radios, an upgraded speaker package, and a power antenna.


The W-40 designation was also used as a Cutlass Calais Quad 442 option. Produced to make Oldsmobile competitive in SCCA racing against Eagle Talon, and other 4-cyl's.

Produced during the 1990 and 1991 model years. About 1360 were produced in '91, according to the Oldsmobile History Center.

Engine Specs:

307 with 180 bhp at 4400 RPM, 245 ft/lbs torque at 3200 RPM, 4-bbl Rochester Quadrajet. 8.0:1 compression.

Transmissions:

Rear Axles:

All '83 and '84 H/Os came with 3:73 gear rear ends code GT4. Limited slip was an option.

Performance Data:

No data.

Engine: Quad4 H.O. 2.3Liter, 4cyl, 180 bhp (Vin A - LGO)
Transmission: Getrag 5-speed
Body Style: 2 Door FWD coupe (Calais)
Distinguishing Characteristics: Gold striping (4- ¼" stripes) around car, trunklid spoiler, 33 MPG highway

Notes: The W-40 Quad442s came out in 1990, and has minor revisions to the engine for 1991.


W-41


1991:

Again, W-41 was used as a Cutlass Calais Quad 442 option.

It was produced during the 1991 model year. 200 cars (mostly Achieva) were made mostly for racing.

Engine: Quad4 H.O. 2.3 liter, 4 cyl, 190 bhp (Vin A? - LGO)
Transmission: Getrag 5-speed, 3.94 final drive ratio, limited slip
Body Style: 2 Door FWD coupe (Calais, Achieva)
Distignuishing characteristics: Silver striping (4- ¼" stripes)around car, trunklid spoiler, ~30 MPG Highway. Very few options were availible since made for SCCA racing.

Notes:
Olds test results: 0-60 in 6.8 sec, ¼ mile in 14.6 sec (95.7 mph speed at trap).

EPA 21 mpg city, 29 mpg highway.

Differences between 180 hp VIN A and the 190 hp VIN A include: hotter cam profile, lower restriction exhaust, and taller transmission gearing.

Won 6 out of 9 IMSA Firestone Firehawk races in 1991.

The most distinguishing feature is the W-41 emblem on the moulding on both the driver's and passenger's front rocker panel. The other exclusive feature is the bright red, with silver stripes, W-41 cover over the engine (plugs, cams, etc.). The words on the cover say "Made exclusively for Oldsmobile". In the center is an Olds rocket next to a "W30" marking.

Engine Specs:

Transmissions:

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:

No data.


1992, 93:

The Achieva SCX was made in 1992 and 1993. It was made by Olds to legalize it for racing. SCCA world champ, NHRA record holder, IMSA Firehawk champ. Great car. 1146 made in 1992, 500 made in 1993.

Special parts included: 190hp Q4 (185hp in 1993), which included the W41 cams, larger exhaust system, a Getrag licensed 5-speed with a .81 5th gear, a concentric slave clutch, a modified version of the FX3 Computer Command Ride package, a larger front stabilizer bar, 2 rear stabilzer bars, a wider rear axle, V-rated 14" tires, a 140 mph speedometer, and a 7000k tach.

This car also came in a C41 version, of which only 11 were made. (The standard version is the C60 version, not to be confused with the option package W41, which both had).

This car included a tank baffle, a Torsen LSD, a oil cooler, no power options or A/C, and a 7400k redline. This car was availible to the public, but was built to be sold to the racers as basis for track cars.

The standard Achieva is pretty unremarkable, but talk to any owner of an SCX, and you'll find a happy car owner. 0-60 in 7.6, 135mph, 31mpg, .86 g's, 15k new, and really cheap to insure. Besides, every time you beat someone, you get to talk about your car, 'cause no one knows what it is!

Engine Specs:

Transmissions:

Rear Axles:

Performance Data:

No data.
[ Thanks to Jason Labay, Jeff Hunter, Pat Clark, Nick DiGiovanni, Bob Barry, Tom Lentz, Michael Allen, Meyer Stolberg, Bob Handren, Scott Mullen, Joe Padavano, Mike Coccagna, Ron Setran, Aaron, Jeff Easton, Tony for this information ]



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